Federal Election 2019: Where the Parties Stand

By Lauren Hollman




Climate Change

Liberal Party

  • Planning on phasing out coal power by 2030 to help exceed the Paris agreement’s carbon emission reduction targets
  • Aiming to end “inefficient” fossil fuel subsidies and protect a quarter of Canada’s natural land and ocean habitats by 2025
  • Planning on creating an agency for clean water; would ban some single-use plastics and plant 2 billion trees over 10 years

New Democratic Party

  • Intends on cutting Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions to 450 megatonnes by 2030
  • Would spend $15 billion retrofitting buildings and create a “climate bank” to invest in renewable energy and clean technology to reach that goal
  • Wants to introduce a single-use plastics ban by 2022 and to boost the support fund for communities hit by natural disasters

Conservative Party

  • Says they are committed to meeting the Paris agreement target but would axe the carbon tax
  • They propose replacing a policy taxing heavy emitters with requirements they invest in clean technology or research
  • They would sign agreements allowing Canada to get credit for helping achieve emissions reductions internationally

Green Party

  • Intends on doubling Canada’s current Paris agreement targets and hit net-zero emissions by 2050
  • The party would ban fracking, end imports of foreign oil, and oppose fossil fuel projects
  • Says they would end fossil fuel subsidies within a year

Bloc Québécois

  • Committed to meeting the Paris agreement targets and exceeding them
  • Opposes building pipelines or investing in fossil fuel projects, promising to cut subsidies within 100 days post-election

People’s Party of Canada

  • Acknowledges climate change is happening, but isn’t convinced humans play a role
  • Maxime Bernier said he would do “nothing” to address climate change and leave it to the private sector to find solutions
  • The party would withdraw from the Paris accord, get rid of green subsidies, and ditch “unrealistic greenhouse gas emission reduction targets.”

Education

Liberal Party

  • Would propose making student loans interest-free for two years after graduation and promises that graduates won’t have to pay until they earn over $35,000 annually
  • Additional proposals include parents to pause loan payments with no interest until their youngest child turns five
  • Planning to boost the maximum Canada Student Grants for full-time students from $3,000 to $4,200.

New Democratic Party

  • Goal is to work towards free university and college tuition
  • Supports eliminating federal interest rates on student loans and would like to put more money into Canada Student Grants
  • They also aim to expand the education benefit from veterans and implement a national school nutrition program

Conservative Party

  • Promises a boost to the Registered Education Savings Plans, raising contributions from 20 to 30 per cent for every dollar invested up to $2,500 a year, to a maximum of $750 a year
  • Scheer backed away from a tax credit for parents who send kids to private and independent schools after critics said it benefited the wealthy.

Green Party

  • Supports getting rid of university and college tuition and forgiving any existing federal student debt
  • The party wants to make sure all Indigenous students have access to post-secondary education and would boost funding for training new immigrants in English and French and supports a national school lunch program

Bloc Québécois

  • Supports larger transfer payments to provinces and territories to help pay for education and finance more university research
  • Support building a Francophone university in Ontario, a project the province cancelled late last year but is now pursuing again

People’s Party of Canada

  • Maxime Bernier feels the federal government intervenes too much in education and calls it “provincial jurisdiction.” However, he has yet to outline exactly what he would do to change the current system.

Jobs

Liberal Party

  • Would propose raising the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour
  • Planning on creating federal rules for those employed by ride-sharing and similar apps
  • Would like to extend Employment Insurance sick benefits from 15 to 26 weeks and ensure reliable benefits for seasonal workers
  • In addition to this, the party would like to create a Canada Training Benefit to improve employee training

New Democratic Party

  • Proposes raising the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour
  • They pledge to create 300,000 new jobs in their first term
  • Wants to ban unpaid internships if they don’t count for school credit
  • Would require employers spend one per cent of their payroll on annual employee training

Conservative Party

  • Intends on further supporting struggling oil workers
  • Promises to end foreign oil imports and get pipelines built, including the Trans Mountain, which they claim will create “tens of thousands” of jobs

Green Party

  • Will aim to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour and ban unpaid internships that aren’t for school credits
  • They will try to cancel the Temporary Foreign Worker program and implement a guaranteed livable income

Bloc Québécois

  • Opposes the sale of any Quebec business to a foreign company
  • Supports a tax credit for recent graduates or immigrants who move to rural areas for work and wants responsibility of the temporary foreign worker program transferred to Quebec

People’s Party of Canada

  • Have not released a policy on this issue, but claims that getting rid of supply management would create “thousands of jobs.”

Pipelines

Liberal Party

  • Supports Line 3, Keystone XL, the massive LNG project running to B.C.’s coast, and the Trans Mountain pipeline extension, which the Liberals bought for $4.5 billion
  • However, they cancelled the Northern Gateway pipeline and changed the rules for the Energy East pipeline, leading to the project’s abandonment

Conservative Party

  • Intends to expand Canada’s oil and gas sector and have accused Liberals of stalling Trans Mountain
  • Andrew Scheer said he would use constitutional powers to declare construction of pipelines to be in the national interest
  • He also would overturn recent legislation restricting the movement of oil tankers in northern B.C.

New Democratic Party

  • Strongly opposes the Trans Mountain project; however, the party’s reversal over the liquefied natural gas project in B.C. has drawn ridicule
  • Jagmeet Singh previously supported the project but backed down in May. Singh still won’t say whether he supports it, telling reporters the future of energy does not include fracking or fossil fuels
  • Singh would give provinces veto power over national infrastructure projects that run through them, including pipelines

Green Party

  • Not supportive of any new pipeline projects and opposes any pipeline carrying diluted bitumen
  • Proposes to cancel the Trans Mountain. Elizabeth May was arrested while protesting the project.
  • Would propose that Canada cuts off ties with oil by 2050. Until then, the party wants to stop imports of foreign oil.

Bloc Québécois

  • Not supportive of new pipelines, especially Energy East, the proposed pipeline that would have run through Quebec
  • Trans Canada cancelled it in 2017 after stiff protests and a federal change in the approval process
  • They want to sell off Trans Mountain

People’s Party of Canada

  • Supports building pipelines and, like the Conservatives, would use constitutional powers to declare pipeline building to be in the national interest
  • Leader Maxime Bernier has said he would be willing to use the Constitution to “impose a pipeline in [his] own province of Quebec” — a move many Quebec politicians reject.

Taxes

Liberal Party

  • Planning to raise the basic personal income tax deduction to $15,000 for those earning under $147,000 
  • In 2015, they added an upper tax bracket for people making more than $200,000 a year, while dropping the tax rate on earnings between $45,282 and $90,563
  • They plan to tax luxury vehicles and tech giants generating revenue in Canada

Conservative Party

  • Promised a “universal tax cut,” cutting the rate on taxable income under $47,630 from 15 to 13.75 per cent over three years
  • Promises to make Employment Insurance benefits for new parents tax-free, remove the GST from home heating costs, and revive the public transit, children’s fitness, and arts tax credits offered under Stephen Harper

New Democratic Party

  • Proposes to increase the rate for capital gains inclusion from 50 to 75 per cent, which means paying more income tax on profits from stocks or the sale of properties other than a primary residence
  • Additionally, they would like to change the top federal personal income tax rate from 33 to 35 per cent and impose a one percent wealth tax on the “super rich” — those making more than $20 million 

Green Party

  • Would like to increase the corporate tax rates from 15 to 21 per cent
  • Proposing to apply a corporate tax on tech companies like Netflix, Facebook, Google, and Airbnb and find a way to tax cryptocurrencies
  • The party says it would create a Federal Tax Commission to ensure the tax system is fair and accessible.

Bloc Québécois

  • Would propose the Quebec government collect federal income taxes rather than the Canada Revenue Agency
  • They argue this would make things simpler for Quebeckers, who would only have to fill out one form instead of two
  • Supportive of taxing online giants like Facebook, Netflix, and Spotify, and further clamping down on tax havens.

People’s Party of Canada

  • Would like to cut the corporate income tax rate from 15 to 10 percent and abolish the personal capital gains tax entirely
  • Proposes a simplified, two-bracket federal income tax where everyone who makes more than $100,000 would have a tax rate of 25 per cent–a discount compared to the current rate.

Leave a Reply