An Interview With Jay Cardinal Villeneuve On His Film “Holy Angels”

Jay Cardinal Villeneuve is an indigenous filmmaker and actor from Slave Lake, Alberta, and his film, Holy Angels, was featured in the Edmonton International Film Festival on Sunday, September 30 at 4pm at Landmark Cinemas 9 at City Centre. Holy Angels is an artistic documentary about Lena Wandering Spirit and her experiences in the residential school system in the 1960s. I was fortunate enough to be able to engage in a half-hour interview with Jay about his amazing film; I was joined by Seth Arcand, a local filmmaker and fellow CUE student. Continue reading An Interview With Jay Cardinal Villeneuve On His Film “Holy Angels”

Solo: A Star Wars Story Review

“Solo: A Star Wars Story” is excellent for three reasons:

First, it explores an era in Star Wars history that we haven’t seen much of before: about halfway between Episodes III and IV, which lends some context to references of “the dark times” made in the original trilogy;

Second, it knows exactly when to lean on the knowledge we have from other films in the saga and when it needs to stand on its own. The dramatic irony is strong with this one;

Third, it manages to be a somewhat non-traditional love letter to hardcore fans of the franchise, like me, without entirely alienating more casual viewers. Continue reading Solo: A Star Wars Story Review

Review: Blade Runner 2049

Despite the fact that the first Blade Runner film was released 35 years ago, Blade Runner 2049 successfully follows the original in both quality and tone. In a world filled with crappy sequels and reboots that try to capitalize on a successful movie’s popularity, Blade Runner 2049 is refreshing. Not only is it a fantastic follow up to the 1982 Ridley Scott original, but it also maintains its own plot and introduces new well-developed characters. Continue reading Review: Blade Runner 2049

Canadians In Entertainment

Canadian media has always seemed like a bit of a joke. For the most part, the majority of Canadian-produced content consists of lamer versions of American shows and channels, such as Much Music and shows like Canadian Idol. Anything new that’s even remotely original to Canada either doesn’t do well or is doomed to fail due to not being accessible enough. Unfortunately, this has been the rut that Canadian artists, filmmakers, and actors have faced for decades, and plenty of our most talented citizens eventually move south to the United States in search of success. However, there are cases of Canadians who have successfully produced content in entertainment that maintained a distinct Canadian identity without becoming Americanized. Continue reading Canadians In Entertainment